Harley-Davidson Engines

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Harley-Davidson Motorenspecial

Milwaukee-Eight

The Harley-Davidson Milwauke-eight engine has been installed in all Touring models since model year 2017 and in new Softail vehicles since 2018. After almost 20 years, the engine replaces the Twin Cam engine, from which it differs markedly through its four-valve technology and better response from the speed cell. The engine’s sound is even more pleasant and uses less fuel, with an unprecedented yet typical Harley-Davidson feel.

The four-valve cylinder heads per cylinder allow an increased gas flow rate of 50% more than the previous two-valve heads. Combined with more efficient combustion due to the new dual ignition, the Milwaukee Eight achieves up to 10% more torque with 11% less fuel consumption. With just one chain-driven camshaft, the Milwaukee Eight’s valve drive is lighter, quieter and simpler than the Twin Cam engine. 75% of the first order vibrations are balanced by a spur gear internal balancer shaft for increased driving comfort. The classic character of a gently shaking Harley V2 is fully retained. At high speeds, the rubber mount ensures smooth vibration behaviour. Current versions are available in 107, 114 and 117 cubic inches. The new engine is below the worldwide noise limits, while the rich exhaust sound is better than ever before. The four-valve cylinder heads per cylinder enable an increased gas flow rate of 50% more than the previous two-valve heads.

In combination with the more efficient combustion due to the new dual ignition, the Milwaukee Eight achieves up to 10% more torque with 11% less fuel consumption. With just one chain-driven camshaft, the Milwaukee Eight’s valve drive is lighter, quieter and simpler than the Twin Cam engine

Milwaukee Eight in short terms

  • More Power
  • Less Consumption
  • Better Acceleration
  • New Design
  • Reduced Vibrations
  • Better Sound

For the typical ignition sequence of a Harley-Davidson Big Twins the Milwaukee-Eight was again given a cylinder angle of 45 degrees and both conrods run on the same crankpin. The interaction provides the famous “Potato, Potato” sound. The idle speed of the Milwaukee Eight was lowered from 1,000 to 850 rpm to make the Harley run quieter and quieter when stationary. The Milwaukee Eight engine has a further developed charging system that delivers 50% more power at 26 amps in idle speed in order to supply the growing proportion of technical gadgets with power in a future-oriented manner.

technical data

Milwaukee-Eight 107 Milwaukee-Eight 114 Milwaukee-Eight 117
engine concept 45 V2 45 V2 45 V2
cubic 1745 cm3 1868 cm3 1923 cm³
Bore x Stroke 100,0 x 111,1 mm 102,0 x 114,3 mm 103,5 x 114,3
Power kW (PS)/U/min 67 (91)/5450 75 (102)/5250 78 (105)/5450
Torrque U/min 153/3250 166/3250 167/3500

Thunderbike Custombikes with Milwaukee-Eight

Harley-Davidson Engine History

 

2001 – 2017 Revolution

The water-cooled Revolution engine does not have much in common with a classic Harley-Davidson engine, except for the long-stroke design and 45 degree cylinder windlass. The engine performed from 1130ccm with 117 to 1250ccm at 124 hp. The engine from 2001 was developed in cooperation with Porsche on the basis of the VR1000 racing engine.

 

1999 – 2016 Twin Cam

The Twin Cam engine delivered more torque and power than the Evolution model and was originally available as a carburetor or with fuel injection. Problems with oil circulation in the Evolution engine prompted Harley-Davidson to equip the Twin Cam with a more powerful internal twin engine oil pump. Meanwhile, the engine reaches up to 1801ccm³ and up to 97 hp.

since 1986  Sportster Evolution

This engine is the basis of all models in the Sportster family, and almost all Buell models are also powered by performance-enhanced, model-maintained derivatives of the Evolution Sportster engine. The engine ranges from 883cm³ with 46 HP to 1202cm³ with 67 HP. In 2007, the Keihin CV carburettor was replaced by an electronic intake manifold injection system. The Sportster models are considered to be the most inexpensive former Harley-Davidson models.

 

1984 – 1999 Evolution

The 1340ccm³ Evolution engine lived up to its name because it was a true evolution. The “Evo” needs significantly less fuel and generates significantly more torque at the same time. On top, it turns more quietly and is therefore also more durable. It was the engine for the then brand-new Softail, which today is regarded as the forefather of the complete Softail series. Depending on the version, it achieves up to 65 hp.

 

1984 – 1999 Evolution

The 1340ccm³ Evolution engine lived up to its name because it was a true evolution. The “Evo” needs significantly less fuel and generates significantly more torque at the same time. On top, it turns more quietly and is therefore also more durable. It was the engine for the then brand-new Softail, which today is regarded as the forefather of the complete Softail series. Depending on the version, it achieves up to 65 hp.

 

1966 – 1984 Shovelhead

Once again, the look of the rocker boxes gives this Harley engine its name. The cylinder head cover reminds of shovels, hence Shovelhead. The 1340 cm³ 65 hp engine has new cylinder heads with redesigned ducts and compact combustion chambers, higher compression pistons, new camshaft and a new carburettor. The last Harley-Davidson engine not developed with computer aided design.

 

1957 – 1984 Ironhead

The then new small, modern engine with a sporty character is driven by a spur gear camshaft. The version with cast iron cylinder and cylinder heads still had 883cm³, this is why it is called Ironhead. The engine was used to drive the then new Sportster series. It was the first Harley that had a whole horsepower per cubic inch.

 

1952 – 1956 K-Model

The sporty version of a Flathead engine had 742cm³ cubic capacity and 30hp. In 1954 Harley-Davidson increased the engine to 38PS and a top speed of 161 km/h. 1250 units were produced and used as the basis for the racing engines of the KK series and as a forerunner of the Sportster engines.

 

1948 – 1965 Panhead

The Panhead engine, which had 60 hp at its deceleration in 1965, was a model for the Electra Glide and already had an electric starter at that time. The Panhead takes its name from the unmistakable cake pan look of the rocker boxes. New aluminium cylinder heads, hydraulic valve lash adjustment and optimised lubrication and cooling make the 1200 Panhead stronger, lighter and more durable.

1948 – 1965 Panhead

The Panhead engine, which had 60 hp at its deceleration in 1965, was a model for the Electra Glide and already had an electric starter at that time. The Panhead takes its name from the unmistakable cake pan look of the rocker boxes. New aluminium cylinder heads, hydraulic valve lash adjustment and optimised lubrication and cooling make the 1200 Panhead stronger, lighter and more durable.

 

1936 – 1947 Knucklehead

The Knucklehead engine was produced from 36-47 and was the first Harley engine with overhead valves. The Knucklehead got its name from its rocker boxes, which resemble the ankles of a human fist. The up to 48 HP strong engine is considered today as father of all later, air-cooled Big Twin engines.

 

1929 – 1973 Flathead

Named after its flat curved cylinder heads, the first Flathead engine appeared in 1929. The valves were arranged sideways. The Flathead engine is optimized up to 1340cm³ capacity and 34 HP. Until 1952 it was used in motorcycles and even until 1973 in the three-wheeled Servi Cars.

1929 – 1973 Flathead

Named after its flat curved cylinder heads, the first Flathead engine appeared in 1929. The valves were arranged sideways. The Flathead engine is optimized up to 1340cm³ capacity and 34 HP. Until 1952 it was used in motorcycles and even until 1973 in the three-wheeled Servi Cars.

 

1911 – 1929 F-Head

The V-Twin engine is fundamentally redesigned and optimized. From now on, the cam shaft actuates the intake valve via a push rod, which is arranged in the cylinder head above the exhaust valve. The engine is continuously improved and reaches at the end of its era 1215cm³ and 24 hp.

 

1909 V-Twin

The two-cylinder engine with a 45° cylinder angle is designed by Harley-Davidson to achieve more power than the current single-cylinders. The 810cm³ and 7 PS strong V-Twin engines are only produced in a small series of 27 pieces.

1909 V-Twin

The two-cylinder engine with a 45° cylinder angle is designed by Harley-Davidson to achieve more power than the current single-cylinders. The 810cm³ and 7 PS strong V-Twin engines are only produced in a small series of 27 pieces.

 

1903 Einzylinder Motor

The first Harley-Davidson was nothing more than a single-cylinder engine mounted on a bicycle frame, which directly drove the rear wheel via a belt. The bike had neither a clutch nor a gearbox. From the outset, the designers attached great importance to stability and quality, which has given Harley-Davidson its reputation as a reliable everyday tool to this day.

your contact

Schnepel

Nico Schnepel

Customparts, Dealer Support

0049 2852 - 6777-33
nico@thunderbike.de

Reiners

Roman Reiners

Customparts, Dealer Support

0049 2852 - 6777-31
roman@thunderbike.de

Emky

Thomas Emky

Custombikes Service Workshop

0049 2852 - 6777-56
thomas@thunderbike.de

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